Recording

Built by Musicians, For Musicians

Just imagine: guitar players slinging Sheetrock; mandolin players gripping onto belt sanders; and singers, pianists, bassists and percussionists hammering 1/01/2004 7:00 AM Eastern

Just imagine: guitar players slinging Sheetrock; mandolin players gripping onto belt sanders; and singers, pianists, bassists and percussionists hammering away. No, it's not a recording scene for a wacky sound library, but the foundation on which The Sugar Shed recording studio (Bath, N.H., about three hours north of Boston) was created.

A musician-based studio, Sugar Shed does not house a traditional console; instead, all mixing is done within a 24-channel MOTU HD192 24-bit/196k AD/DA with I/O converters, a requirement dictated by the studio's space restrictions and the owners' budget. There is no large pane of glass dividing the workspace and the main recording room, which can house three to four musicians, depending on the placement of removable panels around the room. The studio also offers a small live room and a large dead drum room. Monitoring is via a Blue Sky 5.1 system, and Yamaha NS-10Ms with Hafler TA1600 amps.

Geared primarily toward recording and producing singer/songwriters and small ensembles, with an eye toward restoration and remix projects for DVD-A and SACD, the studio has recently hosted the Parker Hill Band (a local bluegrass act), John David (a Philadelphia-based singer/songwriter) and some restoration and archival projects. Even Wes Chapman (a co-owner with wife Betsy) steals some time to work on his own projects.

For more, visit www.sugarshed.com.

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