SFP

TalkBack: How Did You Get Into Game Audio?

I started doing sound design as a child, recording my sister’s voice and then editing it with razors I stole from my father, cutting the tape and putting it back together to change and reverse the

I started doing sound design as a child, recording my sister’s voice and then editing it with razors I stole from my father, cutting the tape and putting it back together to change and reverse the phrases. I then found out that I could achieve better performances from talking through a tube or similar items to make it sound even stranger. At 16, I developed my first polyphonic sequencer using Pascal and Assembly (as a tool for composing music for a game that I was developing as a hobby). Some years later, I joined a band as a guitarist and started exploring music creation even more. Then in my early 20s circa 1996, a programmer friend of mine told me to make some music for one of his indie-developed games and I made the music and the effects, which turned me to making game sounds again—and I never looked back. Now I own my own development company and a publishing label offering royalty-free game audio content. I think that it was always in me: I never left it even when playing guitar for a thrash-metal band, carrying seven effects pedals; the other bandmembers would laugh from the weird (and many times funny) sounds I made all the time.


—Panozk, Panozk.com

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