Live Sound

All-Around Good Tips

The supercardioid 105 capsule is not for everyone. It depends on the artist and the situation. What helps with Mary is that the drummer is on a second level above her and everybody is on ears, so the 10/19/2007 11:53 AM Eastern

It's all about making everything fit into the spectrum of frequencies. If you subtract something from one instrument, it might be wise to add it to another. For instance, if I take the upper mids out of a guitar so it won't thrash your ears as much, I'll add the same back to the cello. The cello produces a lot of low end anyway, so that just makes it come out more.
—Adam Fisher



Ramon Morales

The supercardioid 105 capsule is not for everyone. It depends on the artist and the situation. What helps with Mary is that the drummer is on a second level above her and everybody is on ears, so there are no amps onstage. I have two wedges, and that's it. It's a quiet stage, and she's got so much energy we don't worry about her not giving us enough level. I'm actually turning her down! I have three combiners, as I'm using a total of nine units. It's a beautiful thing that they have power, as well. There's one AC cord and it powers four units. I do my [frequency] research by going to the Sennheiser Website [to] see what's going on in the area we're visiting. It's becoming harder and harder to find usable frequencies. But recently, I've been using what was pre-selected on all the units, and it's working out pretty good.
—Ramon Morales

The most useful tip I can offer is to keep the lines of communication open with all of the audio departments, including the band. By having positive communication with the band, the source sound can be controlled. On the Nelly Furtado tour, I have been blessed with a phenomenal crew, one that can get all that closer to a great sound. You never know who can supply a great tip to make the show all that much better. If you do not have a crew, make sure that the relationship between the FOH and monitor operator is positive and open. This can make the most difficult of gigs more pleasant.
—Jeffrey Luge Holdip