Recording

Dolby Inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame

The National Inventors Hall of Fame inducted Ray Dolby last week in recognition of his invention of the Dolby® noise reduction system. “Ray Dolby changed 5/05/2004 8:00 AM Eastern

The National Inventors Hall of Fame inducted Ray Dolby last week in recognition of his invention of the Dolby® noise reduction system.

“Ray Dolby changed the face of the recording industry with his noise reduction system. The multitrack recording techniques that blossomed in the late 1960s and early 1970s would have been impossible without Dolby’s invention because the tape hiss would have been intolerable,” said Fred Allen, head of the Selection Committee for the National Inventors Hall of Fame Foundation. “And today, applied to consumer formats and motion picture sound, the results are even more far-reaching. With the removal of tape noise, cinema sound became higher fidelity and paved the way for even more sophisticated surround sound formats like Dolby Stereo.”

At a ceremony at the National Inventors Hall of Fame headquarters in Akron, Ohio, Dolby and 19 other inventors joined such historic figures as Alexander Graham Bell, Eli Whitney and Thomas Edison in the National Inventors Hall of Fame. To qualify for this distinction, an inductee’s invention must have contributed to the welfare of society and have promoted the progress of science and the useful arts. All nominations are reviewed by the National Inventors Hall of Fame Selection Committee, comprising representatives from national science and technology organizations.

Read about Dolby’s latest developments at www.dolby.com.