Author Profile

Gary Eskow

Gary Eskow writes music, words, plays tennis and reads too much. He'd be happy if you'd listen to his work if you have a few minutes. All of it streams for free at: http://www.nimbitmusic.com/garyeskow. Please feel free to contact him via email (scribeny@aol.com) or through his Facebook Artist Page, "From a Quiet Place."

Two Ways to Look at the Score

If you plan on building a long-term career in the competitive L.A. recording industry, it doesn’t hurt to wear multiple hats. Ask Norman Ludwin. A highly accomplished and in-demand double bass player whose musicality has helped bring to life scores for Jurassic World, Star Trek Into Darkness, WALL-E and dozens of other major motion pictures, Ludwin is an orchestrator who has fleshed out scores......

Jeff Russo: Song to Score

Foregoing college, composer Jeff Russo climbed into a 1963 Chevrolet Corvair after graduating from high school in 1987 and headed to Los Angeles to track down his dream. A couple of friends, including future superstar Lenny Kravitz, shared expenses and time behind the wheel. “I grew up in New York City,” says Russo, “but L.A. had a strong pull on me.” ......

Composer Shota Nakama and His Video Game Orchestra

It may seem hard to believe, but the videogame industry is in a graying stage. You can set the time it reached maturity anywhere from the mid-1990s on, but it’s certainly true that a generation-plus has grown up without knowing a universe devoid of galactic heroes, ancient villains and stolen vehicles, all residing inside the box. ......

Museum-Quality Bowie

With a long career trailing behind him and the future an open road, it may seem premature to consider David Bowie as a fitting subject for a retrospective exhibition. But Bowie’s been a public performer for 50 years and has generated a broad following as a singer/songwriter, actor and cultural icon; it’s appropriate that his work be taken seriously. ......

‘La Traviata’ at Mount Masada

When Giuseppe Verdi penned his classic opera “La Traviata” in the middle of the 19th century, it’s unlikely that he considered the possibility that this work, which details the fall of a trollop with a golden heart, would one day be staged in the foothills of Mt. Masada, where followers of Herod the Great had mounted their own epic performance several millennia earlier. ......

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