Meyer Sound Demonstrates MICA at Shrine Auditorium

On August 10, 2005, audio designers and engineers from the Western U.S. joined Meyer Sound at the 6,300-seat Shrine Auditorium (Los Angeles) for an introduction to and demonstration of Meyer Sound’s new MICA compact high-power curvilinear array loudspeaker.
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On August 10, 2005, audio designers and engineers from the Western U.S. joined Meyer Sound at the 6,300-seat Shrine Auditorium (Los Angeles) for an introduction to and demonstration of Meyer Sound’s new MICA compact high-power curvilinear array loudspeaker.

MICA, a smaller, lighter version of the large-format MILO high-power curvilinear array loudspeaker, is geared for mid-sized venues that don’t require the additional power and throw of MILO or as an adjunct to a MILO main system.

After being greeted by Meyer Sound’s western regional sales manager Jim Sides, the event’s host, a CD selection was played over what Meyer Sound’s John Monitto called “MICA in the raw”: two MICA cabinets and one of the new 600-HP high-power subwoofers ground-stacked on a caster frame sitting center stage, with no equalization or other external signal processing.

Adam Ogden, from Las Vegas’ Canyon Ridge Christian Church, which is planning to install a MICA in its new sanctuary, was thrilled to hear the MICA. “We were all very impressed with it,” Ogden says. “It was a great first-listen.”

Next, guests listened to the main system, which comprised left and right arrays, each comprising 16 MICA cabinets hung under two 600-HP subwoofers, supplemented by four 700-HP ultrahigh-power subwoofers on each side of the stage. Seven M1D ultra-compact curvilinear array loudspeakers were deployed individually for frontfill.

Music included James Taylor singing “That Lonesome Road,” demonstrating MICA’s clarity and tone, and a Brazilian selection showing off the substantial low-frequency power provided by the 700-HP arrays and flown 600-HP units. A live drum introduction performed by L.A. drummer Larry Pascal segued into a rock cut that let the attendees hear how MICA handled high-energy electrified music.

To test the system live, the crowd was treated to several songs by L.A.’s Reno Jones, an eight-piece horn band playing original R&B. The event concluded with Monitto and Sides answering questions.

Says Will Nealie, director of audio engineering and design for events staging company Creative Technology, “The captive rigging hardware seemed refined, even beyond the MILO system, and the reduced weight makes eight flown boxes total about a half-ton, which is very doable in a ballroom situation.”

Shrine general manager Duke Collister concurs. “These have been an interesting couple of days,” he notes, who is already looking at designs for the system the Shrine will be installing to handle its upcoming schedule of events—the Emmys, the BET (Black Entertainment Television) and American Music Awards—as well as bidding on next year’s summer tours. “Having the right sound system means a lot and will be a plus for us.”

For more information, please go to www.meyersound.com.