Tedeschi Trucks Band Engineers Use DiGiCo Consoles in Recording Shows

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The Tedeschi Trucks Band

Photo: Marc Lowenstein

In 2012, the Tedeschi Trucks Band released Everybody's Talkin': Tedeschi Trucks Band Live, a 2-CD set that documents highlights from the 11-piece band's 2011 tour behind its latest studio release, Revelator. SK Systems, based in Islandia, N.Y., provided the audio system for this tour, which included DiGiCo SD10 (front-of-house) and SD8 (monitors) consoles. Monitor engineer Bobby Tis used the SD8 console as part of his recording rig.

“For that 2011 tour,” Tis says, “I brought out a rack of Neve and API outboard preamps and a few sweet vintage compressors. We used them for some of our most important channels and fed the preamps' line-in to the DiGiCo stage rack. I recorded to two systems simultaneously throughout the whole tour. I had Cubase running on my MacBook Pro through a [RME HDSPe] MADIface as my backup recorder, which I also used for playback for the band and virtual soundcheck. The main recorder—the one we mixed the album from—was a JoeCo BBR-64 MADI. The JoeCo recorder integrated seamlessly with the DiGiCo and gave us 64 recordable tracks via MADI. It was easy to use, stable, and—amazingly—neither recorder crashed the whole tour and the tracks sounded great. Having the DiGiCo for these recordings made the project very easy. I was even able to assign a stereo aux to a pair of tracks and print a rough mix along with the multitracks as the show was going on. I would do it again the same way.”

Front-of-house engineer Brian Speiser uses the SD10 in tandem with an RME MADIFace into a MacBook Pro running Logic to track the occasional show for virtual soundcheck purposes. But he says that for most shows, he’s recording a board mix through that same setup as a reference for the band to listen to.

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FOH engineer Brian Speiser (left) and monitor engineer Bobby Tis

Photo: Marc Lowenstein

Speiser says that the SD10's EQ/multiband comp capabilities help him "to be able to put any sort of fader or output in any slot I want. I can keep everything I need in front of me and move channels I don't need as often. Having an 11-piece band, you really need to make the most out of the space you have, and I can personalize the console exactly as I see fit. The dynamic EQ is a great way to maintain the life of a vocal or instrument and still pull certain trouble frequencies out only when they start to get out of control. One other feature that has come in quite handy on the SD10 is the multiple User Defined Keys [macros]. With so much going on on our stage, and musicians moving around to different mics, I'm able to use the macros to change what mics show up on what channels, allowing me to keep everybody's settings the same for their voice or instrument no matter where on stage they decide to play.”

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Monitor engineer Bobby Tis at the DiGiCo SD8 console

Photo: Marc Lowenstein

As for outboard gear, Speiser says he keeps it to a bare minimum for consistency’s sake. “It was important to me when I started working with TTB to try and keep everything in the box so that I can advance to have an SD8 or SD10 on fly dates and still be able to keep my session sounding the same. On our tour, the only piece of gear I have with me is a Dolby Lake Processor on my mix outputs so that I can walk around and EQ each venue on a tablet computer. I plan to try adding a Waves SoundGrid in the future, but we haven't had the chance to implement it just yet.”

Tis says, “I’m mixing the band through post-fade groups for the most part. Everyone gets themselves pre-fade off their channels and everything else in the mix is coming in post-fade through groups. This allows me to mix the show off the main faders and have the fader movement translate proportionally in everyone’s mix simultaneously. I've been using this technique for a while, but it’s definitely the best it has ever been with the SD8.

“Being able to have multiple versions (MultiPatch) of the same input to be used in different mixes on the stage, on the fader bank layers, and the flexibility of the mixing surface all help me keep those additional faders organized and streamlined,” Tis continues. “I also really like having the macros even though I'm using them for not so exciting stuff. I have them set up as buttons that I'd like to have that are not built-in on the surface—for instance, ‘Gain tracking On/Off’ for all channels, ‘Fader Flip On/Off,’ ‘Save Session,’ and I have a couple assigned to specific channel mutes and mute groups. I don't use a lot of snapshots, but I do have a few for certain tunes where our vocalists or keyboard/flute player moves to different positions on the stage.

“I’m also a huge fan of DiGiCo’s snapshot scope," Tis adds, "which is second to none in my opinion. The few that I'm using, which are scoped to see aux-send level and mute, have helped me to solve some issues of consistency I’ve had in the past when our vocalist or keys/flute player change positions on stage. Also, on some legs of the tour the band will do some stripped-down blues tunes, which is pretty much an ‘audio scene change.’ The snapshots have helped me keep that portion of the show very consistent without having to flip though every mix and make adjustments. I'm also a big fan of the Multiband Compressors and Dynamic EQs. They really help me to keep the most musical parts of my lead instruments in focus on a stage with 11 musicians, 10 wedge mixes and two drum fills.

“We've had several positive comments about the consistency of the sound of our show from the band,” Tis says. “In monitors, I’ve heard certain band members feel great because they can musically communicate with each other, which, I believe, is because of how the SD8 allows me to mix the show. With Brian at FOH with his SD10, too, the band has especially noticed that they are getting their musical statements across to the audience in a very focused, conducive, and high-fidelity manner night after night, and overall the audiences have become more energetic because of this. The consoles have helped us raise the bar for this organization. In my opinion the DiGiCo SD Series consoles are, hands down, the best sounding and most flexible digital consoles on the market. I've used almost all of the digital consoles that are out there over the years and not one of them is capable of out performing my SD8 for its application with this band. This console makes my job fun every day because I know I can do anything I need to.”

Find more information on the DiGiCo SD10 digital console.

Find more information on the DiGiCo SD8 digital console.

Visit SK Systems at www.sk-systems.com.

For more on the Tedeschi Trucks Band, visit www.derekandsusan.net.