Composer/Musician Viktor Krauss Features REDDI in Home Studio

Viktor Krauss, a young composer and musician who plays piano, trumpet and double bass has played with Lyle Lovett, Graham Nash, Bill Frisell and The Chieftains. Krauss recently took a break from composing, producing, recording and touring in order to record his own solo release Far From Enough.
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Viktor Krauss, a young composer and musician who plays piano, trumpet and double bass has played with Lyle Lovett, Graham Nash, Bill Frisell and The Chieftains. Krauss recently took a break from composing, producing, recording and touring in order to record his own solo release Far From Enough.

"I'm sort of a gear junkie," admits Krauss. "Ross, the engineer on the [John] Fogerty project, was using a REDDI. I saw it out of the corner of my eye and asked, 'What's that?' After using it, I thought it was great."

The REDDI direct box is designed for use with basses, guitars, synthesizers and other electronic instruments. Featuring a 6N1P tube, the REDDI offers a Neutrik combination XLR/quarter-inch input, balanced XLR output, on/off toggle switch, LED power indicator, level control knob, ground lift, EIN power connector, a metal vented casing, custom output transformer and an enclosed power supply with Toroid power transformer.

Krauss even replaced an old favorite DI upon discovering the REDDI's benefits: "The REDDI has a character of its own. I have been using the REDDI with the more electric sounding Underwood pickup for the low- to mid-frequency range and punch. I have found the REDDI to significantly help the tonal qualities of this pickup. Another great thing about the REDDI is its sweepable gain, which offers great variation for hitting a pre-amp and/or compressor."

When working at his home studio, Krauss most often records bass tracks exclusively direct, "but it depends on whatever the session calls for," he reasons. "I use the REDDI in conjunction with a Universal Audio 6176 channel strip, especially for electric bass. It just works wonderfully. If I need an over-driven sound, I have a little Ampeg B12 amp that I use. If it needs to be really clean, then I'll just use the REDDI." Krauss considers a Shure SM57 the best "safe" choice for miking his bass cabinets, while the AKG D 112 is good when the bass needs to be "a little puffier-sounding."

Krauss' use of the REDDI isn't limited to recording bass tracks though. "I really like the REDDI for any electric stuff," he says. "It's a great recording tool for just about anything. To my ears, it always seems to be very transparent. It captures the essence of the instrument instead of coloring it."

For more information, please go to www.transaudiogroup.com.