Steinberg Showcases New Nuendo Synchronizer at AES

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At the AES 2006 show in San Francisco, Steinberg Media Technologies GmbH displayed a prototype of a new synchronizer device tailored to the needs of post-production for its Nuendo Media Production System. Steinberg will develop the yet unnamed device in close cooperation with hardware manufacturer CB Electronics.

"We're very excited to be developing a first-class new synchronizer for Nuendo together with Colin Broad of CB Electronics, one of the world's leading manufacturers of hardware for post-production," says Lars Baumann, Steinberg's senior product manager for Nuendo. "Despite the current trend towards accomplishing ever more tasks using video within DAWs, many post people still have a requirement to integrate their audio workstation with other devices. The new hardware will couple the open, innovative and scalable Nuendo DAW technology with Colin's 25 years of experience and his outstanding technical know-how in this field.”

The new unit will be fitted with a wide range of physical interfaces for machine control and synchronization, including support for LTC, MTC/MMC, Sony 9-pin machine control, Sony 9-pin emulation, word clock and GPIO. The
synchronizer will be designed to tightly integrate with Steinberg’s Nuendo Media Production System with a sample-accurate VST System Link connection.

According to Steinberg, the new hardware will complete the existing Nuendo feature set for synchronization and machine control. It will offer locking to a variety of reference sources such as AES/EBU signals, and also to video reference including tri-level sync signals from HD video devices. Two RS-422 ports will enable Nuendo to act either as a Sony 9-Pin Controller or Device. As a 9-pin controller, Nuendo will slave to either LTC or VITC with a single serial connection. The new hardware will interface with the Nuendo software via USB to establish near sample-accurate synchronization using a VST System Link connection to the computer’s audio interface with help of any commonly used digital connection, such as RCA, BNC, XLR or optical.

For more information, visit www.steinberg.net and www.colinbroad.com.